Summer flowers, its magic and beauty. Pink peonies. Part 2.

ArtTravel

Still life and urban sketching. Art and travel

My first flowers’ posts are about peonies. Why peonies? My mom used to have plenty of these bright summer flowers around my parents’ summer house and I loved their tiny pink hats and their tender scent. 

A peony was growing as a Queen-like flower, beautifully colored, some places in red, some in pink, and some in tender violet. Impressionism style, watercolor painted

I am looking forward for my next trip to Europe to use my new favourite subject flowers to paint and draw, both watercolour and ink.

A tender pink peony in impressionism style, watercolor painted

https://travelartblog.home.blog/portfolio/summer-flowers-pink-peony/

Bon voyage! Until the next travel:) Stay healthy.

All paintings belong to the author. No image is to be copied without permission.

You can visit my personal website pages here and find out more about the artwork I am offering in oil and watercolor paintings; purchase canvas prints, framed prints, and more artwork.

My favourite art store in Toronto Deserres, Spadina Ave

Tools used for my painting Watercolour used Charvin and Van Gogh brands, Pastel GrayPas Expressionist, Derwent watercolour pencils and Faber Castell artist pens. Paper Strathmore Watercolour and Mixed Media albums, 15×20 cm (6×8 in.)

Summer flowers, its magic and beauty. Pink peonies. Part 1.

ArtTravel

Still life and urban sketching. Art and travel

Do you like flowers? All different kinds or one specific type? Do you like your flowers bright or tender? With or without smell? Proud Queen-like flowers like roses or the humble but beautiful daisies?

This summer I took a new painting watercolor graphics course called Flowers. Before this, still life and flowers in particular were not my usual subject for painting and drawing. These studies smashed many of my previous ideas about my favorite subjects, what I like to paint and what I don’t. In this course, I was trying to paint and draw different flowers and use new techniques for my new joyful studies. I will share my discoveries in combined bright flower posts.

Three pink peonies in a garden, watercolor and ink painted.

https://pixels.com/featured/summer-flowers-peony-queen-tamara-vitsenkova.html

Bon voyage! Until the next travel:) Stay healthy.

All paintings belong to the author. No image is to be copied without permission.

You can visit my personal website pages here and find out more about the artwork I am offering in oil and watercolor paintings; purchase canvas prints, framed prints, and more artwork.

Tools used for my painting Watercolour used Charvin and Van Gogh brands, Pastel GrayPas Expressionist, Derwent watercolour pencils and Faber Castell artist pens. Paper Strathmore Watercolour and Mixed Media albums, 15×20 cm (6×8 in.)

My favorite art store in Toronto Deserres, Spadina Ave

Art and Travel. Introduction and the Ideal Domus Italica.

Roman Architecture, Uncategorized

Watercolor journey with the course Roman Architecture by the Yale University.

I continue the stay-at-home travel Art + Roman Architecture + the city of Rome with Yale’s course Roman Architecture https://www.coursera.org/learn/roman-architecture.

C. 5-1

The next lecture was about residential architecture in Rome and the Roman world. It tells us about domestic architecture in between the 1st century BC and 1st century AD. There is no place where the houses are better preserved than at Pompeii, the great live reference for architects and archaeologists.

The watercolour painting is about a two-story house in Pompeii located on via dell’Abandanza, the so-called street of abundance. The house had open panoramic windows. The ancient architect designed the second floor in such a way that you could enjoy a nice view through the columns of the street and watch people outside while sitting in your dining room. I added a gentle glow of dawn on the horizon to imagine what a spring morning in that house would feel like.  

https://pixels.com/featured/domus-italica-residential-house-in-pompeii-tamara-vitsenkova.html

There is a difference between our current understanding of how we use our homes and the ancient concept of home space. Although we enjoy having friends, family visits in our places, still, the house is our place to get away from work, transportation and schools,  escaping outside life –  as opposed to ancient Romans. For them, home was a place not just to live with their families, but also to do business in the house’s atrium.

This house is example of the early domestic buildings, the part of Roman architecture. It had Domus Italica, an ideal Roman house plan according to the books of Vitruvius, the ancient architecture theoretician. The owners, family, friends and business partners could all benefit of being here. Joie de vivre in French or dolce vita in Italian:)

All roads lead to Rome- Alain de Lille

Bon voyage! Until the next travel:) Stay healthy.

All paintings belong to the author. No image is to be copied without permission.

previous post

https://travelartblog.home.blog/2021/05/14/art-and-travel-daily-life-and-the-eruption-of-vesuvius-watercolor-journey-with-the-course-roman-architecture-by-the-yale-university/

http://tamara-vitsenkova.pixels.com

My favorite art store in Toronto is Deserres at Spadina Ave

https://www.coursera.org/learn/roman-architecture/home/welcome

Painting – Residential two storied house via dell’Abandanza, Roman Architecture

Year of construction 62 AD-79 AD

Address: via dell’Abandanza, Pompeii

Tools used for my painting Watercolour Van Gogh cadmium orange and permanent rose, Albert Durer and Faber Castell watercolour pencils. Paper Acquarello Fabriano, grana grossa rouch watercolour album, 22×30 cm (9 ×12 in.)

Art and Travel. Daily Life and the Eruption of Vesuvius

Artist, Roman Architecture, Uncategorized, Urban sketching, Voyage

Watercolor journey with the course Roman Architecture by the Yale University.

I continue the stay-at-home travel Art + Roman Architecture + the city of Rome with Yale’s course Roman Architecture https://www.coursera.org/learn/roman-architecture.

C. 4-6

This part of Roman Architecture‘s course was about Pompeii’s daily life in general, with many photo references. Pompeii’s streets look very modern with lots of bakeries, wine shops in the residential part of the city. For example, scientists discovered more than 30 bakeries. Few people in ancient Rome could afford to bake bread at home, so most bought it in the bakeries. Millstones for bake and for bay and ovens, that are part of bakeries look exactly as today’s bakeries in Italy. There were many fountains everywhere, for example a famous fountain with representations of the goddess Ceres.

I chose to paint the residential area with BIG pedestrian polygonal blocks of stones. It is a crossing part of the street. They are “talking” to us, telling their ancient stories about Pompeii’s daily life.  If there was torrential rain, and the water piled up, people needed to cross the street without stepping in the water, but how? Romans were ingenious and concerned about their roads and pedestrians.

The stepping stones were placed in the streets so that people could cross the roads during and after the rain. Ancient people could easily walk around and were not afraid to wet their shoes and long dresses, As they continued gathering with friends and families, walking to the city’s centre or theatre, enjoying their daily life.

At the same time, these stepping stones were spaced apart far enough so that carts could still pass through the streets easily. The visible ruts that came from the horses and carts, between the stepping stones, show that they had to coordinate the wheels of the cart in such a way that they would span the stepping stones. Ancient Pompeii citizens could easily make their way across that stream by utilizing these stepping stones, “pondera”.

This was a Genius architecture feat with responsible thinking thought about pedestrians. And even when my family walked in the city-museum of Pompeii with its astonishing view and a background of 2 majestic mountains- Vesuvius and Montezuma, we still found ourselves completely astounded by the stepping stones!

All roads lead to Rome- Alain de Lille

Bon voyage! Until the next travel:) Stay healthy.

All paintings belong to the author. No image is to be copied without permission.

previous post

https://travelartblog.home.blog/2021/05/12/art-and-travel-bath-complexes-at-pompeii-watercolor-journey-with-the-course-roman-architecture-by-the-yale-university/

My favorite art store in Toronto is Deserres at Spadina Ave

https://www.coursera.org/learn/roman-architecture/home/welcome

Painting – stones on the Streets of Pompeii -Daily Life, Roman Architecture

Year of construction- 79AD

Address: Pompeii

Tools used for my painting Watercolour raw sienna, permanent rose, Charving vert imperial, Albert Durer and Faber Castell watercolour pencils. Paper Van Gogh National gallery watercolour album, 22×30 cm (9 ×12 in.)

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Art and Travel. Bath Complexes at Pompeii.

Artist, Roman Architecture, Uncategorized

Watercolor journey with the course Roman Architecture by the Yale University.

I continue the stay-at-home travel Art + Roman Architecture + the city of Rome with Yale’s course Roman Architecture https://www.coursera.org/learn/roman-architecture.

C. 4-5

The Bathing culture was a very important aspect of Roman society. Social relations were also developed in those baths with many activities –sport, massage rooms and libraries, but sometimes the Bath complex also had direct access to … taverns:) In ancient Pompeii there were five large thermal baths and each bath could house about 1000 guests at the same time. The thermal baths were not only used to rest the body but the mind as well.

For my watercolor painting I chose one of the best preserved Bath with beautiful and ostentatious decoration, the Stabian thermal bath, painted red, blue and white colors. It was completed in the 4BC with a room that had the “eye” to the sky. It was one of the predecessors to the Pantheon’s roof.  Streams of water fell in the pool directly from the niche in the upper part of the wall. The thermal baths were to help ancient people see and appreciate art! There were beautiful decorations, statues of Giants holding spa wall – everything for the people to enjoy seeing the amazing frescoes on the walls and decorate ceiling.  It’s like “Louvre” of saunas..

The Stabian Bath was one of severance thermal bath complexes in Pompeii, and part of the Roman Architecture development of the early bathing culture. I imagine myself in the beautiful relaxing rooms: In the Frigidarium room, the cold one with dozens of painted Atlantis figures supporting the walls, the Caldarium-hot room, the Tepidarium which was the lukewarm room and the apodyterium which served as the change room. The walls were stuccoed over, with flowering acanthus plants and creatures and animals, humans, Goddesses and Gods flying above:)

It was a wonderful place where people would enjoy their time in the company of friends and family.

https://pixels.com/featured/bath-complexes-at-pompeii-roman-architecture-tamara-vitsenkova.html

All roads lead to Rome- Alain de Lille

Bon voyage! Until the next travel:) Stay healthy.

All paintings belong to the author. No image is to be copied without permission.

previous post

https://travelartblog.home.blog/2021/05/06/art-and-travel-pompeiis-entertainment-district-the-amphitheater-theater-and-music-hall-watercolor-journey-with-the-course-roman-architecture-by-the-yale-university/

You can visit my personal website pages here and find out more about the artwork I am offering in oil and watercolor paintings; purchase canvas prints, framed prints, and more artwork.

My favorite art store in Toronto is Deserres at Spadina Ave

https://www.coursera.org/learn/roman-architecture/home/welcome

Bath Complexes at Pompeii 

Painting – Bath Complexes at Pompeii, Roman Architecture

Year of construction 4BC

Address: Stabian thermal bath, Pompeii

Tools used for my painting Watercolour Van Gogh madler red and Charvin Bleu de France, Albert Durer and Faber Castell watercolour pencils. Paper Acquarello Fabriano cold pressed watercolour album, 22×30 cm (9 ×12 in.)

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Art and Travel. The Capitolium and Basilica of Pompeii.

Roman Architecture, Uncategorized

Watercolor journey with the course Roman Architecture by the Yale University.

I continue the stay-at-home travel Art + Roman Architecture + the city of Rome with Yale’s course Roman Architecture https://www.coursera.org/learn/roman-architecture.

C. 4-3

The financial public building had a very important part in the public life of ancient Romans. The ancient building has been stuccoed with white marble under Samonite’s rule and then the city became a part of the Romans colony. The Basilica was used as a site for court hearings, as well as to gather large groups to discuss some business and legal subjects and to hold public meetings. This was the place of Tribunals where the judge would reveal the law cases.

In my painting is the oldest public building in Pompeii -the Basilica. The Basilica was roofed in antiquity, but the roof has not been preserved until our days. It had Ionic capitals on the first floor and Corinthian capitals on the second floor.  It consisted of two meter high podiums on top of which were six Corinthian columns. The tribunal is, amazingly, well preserved…

Imagine that you are walking inside the Basilica, enjoying the richly decorated walls with stucco like large blocks of marble, statues as you respectfully approaching the Judge who is waiting for another law-court …

https://pixels.com/featured/1-the-capitolium-and-basilica-of-pompeii–roman-architecture-tamara-vitsenkova.html

All roads lead to Rome- Alain de Lille

Bon voyage! Until the next travel:) Stay healthy.

All paintings belong to the author. No image is to be copied without permission.

previous post

https://travelartblog.home.blog/2021/05/04/art-and-travel-the-early-settlement-and-the-forum-at-pompeii-watercolor-journey-with-the-course-roman-architecture-by-the-yale-university/

You can visit my personal website pages here and find out more about the artwork I am offering in oil and watercolor paintings; purchase canvas prints, framed prints, and more artwork.

My favorite art store in Toronto is Deserres at Spadina Ave

https://www.coursera.org/learn/roman-architecture/home/welcome

Painting – Basilica of Pompeii, Roman Architecture

Year of construction- 120 BC

Address: Basilica, Pompeii

Tools used for my painting Watercolour PWC shell, Charvin revin red and sap green, Albert Durer and Faber Castell watercolour pencils. Paper Acquarello Fabriano, grana grossa rouch watercolour album, 22×30 cm (9 ×12 in.)

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Art and Travel. Pompeii’s Entertainment District: The Amphitheater, Theater, and Music Hall.

Artist, Roman Architecture, Uncategorized

Watercolor journey with the course Roman Architecture by the Yale University.

I continue the stay-at-home travel Art + Roman Architecture + the city of Rome with Yale’s course Roman Architecture https://www.coursera.org/learn/roman-architecture.

C. 4-4

When Romans made Pompeii the city for their retired veterans, they needed to entertain people.
The Pompeii entertainment district had several buildings such as a Theatre, Music hall and Pompeii’s Amphitheatre. I chose to paint the Amphitheatre that was completed in 80 BC; it is the oldest well-preserved stone amphitheater.

For my watercolor reference’s painting of the Pompeii’s Amphitheatre, I used the Google Earth app to view the building from a bird’s eye view. Imagine 20000 Roman veterans sitting in this arena and watching the shows in their Entertainment District. Ancient Pompeii’s citizens gathered here to watch gladiators fight one another or wild animals.


This is another example of a masterful use of concrete. The amphitheater with a staircase so unique, its design had not been repeated anywhere ever again. Although the fanning on top of the stairs that protected it against the rain has not survived until our days, what remains is a painting with the amphitheater with its staircase and the fanning hanging on top of it.

The Amphitheatre is one of the predecessors of Rome’s Coliseum and all other amphitheatres in the world. How did the Roman architects design this amazing building? A unique amphitheater creation of Roman architects. As opposed to the ancient Greeks, the Romans did not seek out a particularly fitting hill for an amphitheater that would suit the angled tribune seats. Instead, they would dig out a giant hole in the ground and use the ground level for the arena. All the dug up soil would be flattened and spread out around the diameter of the amphitheater hole and reinforced with concrete. These amphitheaters would hold up to 20,000 viewers!

All roads lead to Rome- Alain de Lille

Bon voyage! Until the next travel:) Stay healthy.

All paintings belong to the author. No image is to be copied without permission.

previous post

https://travelartblog.home.blog/2021/05/07/art-and-travel-the-capitolium-and-basilica-of-pompeii-watercolor-journey-with-the-course-roman-architecture-by-the-yale-university/

You can visit my personal website pages here and find out more about the artwork I am offering in oil and watercolor paintings; purchase canvas prints, framed prints, and more artwork.

My favorite art store in Toronto is Deserres at Spadina Ave

https://www.coursera.org/learn/roman-architecture/home/welcome

Painting – Pompeii’s Amphitheater, Roman Architecture

Year of construction- 80 BC

Address: Amphitheatre, Pompeii

Tools used for my painting Watercolour Van Gogh cobalt blue, lemon yellow and cadmium orange, Albert Durer and Faber Castell watercolour pencils. Paper Acquarello Fabriano, grana grossa rouch watercolour album, 22×30 cm (9 ×12 in.)

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Art and Travel. The Early Settlement and the Forum at Pompeii .

Artist, Roman Architecture

Watercolor journey with the course Roman Architecture by the Yale University.

I continue the stay-at-home travel Art + Roman Architecture + the city of Rome with Yale’s course Roman Architecture https://www.coursera.org/learn/roman-architecture.

C. 4-2

One of the main pieces of Ancient Roman public architecture in Pompeii was the Forum on the main square. Here citizens were gathering to run business, gossips, and it was the urban centre of life.

On my painting is the main part of the financial district, the antique downtown of a well-preserved ancient city… The view of the colonnade with Doric columns built around the Forum with bases tht supported statues. The Forum was uncovered and opened to the sky. The columns made out of limestone are similar to the Roman’s Theatre of Marcellus with the Greek orders, Doric, Iconic and Corinthian.

The Temple of Jupiter, Juno and Minerva was the central temple in Pompeii, sometimes called the Temple of the Capitoline Triad with spaces for statues of the Capitoline Triad- Jupiter, Juno and Minerva. The whole temple was surrounded by a colonnade with Ionic columns; this left the strongest impression on me during my travels to Italy.

Why were parts of the columns are cut off? After the earthquake of 63BC and the Mount Vesuvius eruption in 79 BC while the ash and lava covered the Forum, columns and buildings came down and the materials washed away or were taken away- now it is an unknown mystery. Who knows the actual reasons? 😉

It is here that you can feel the atmosphere of those years and understand that life is eternal…

All roads lead to Rome- Alain de Lille

Bon voyage! Until the next travel:) Stay healthy.

All paintings belong to the author. No image is to be copied without permission.

previous post

https://travelartblog.home.blog/2021/05/03/art-and-travel-introduction-to-pompeii-and-the-citys-history-watercolor-journey-with-the-course-roman-architecture-by-the-yale-university/

https://www.artincanada.com/gallery/tamara-vitsenkova/ https://www.artwanted.com/tvitsenkova/slideshow/ https://fineartamerica.com/profiles/tamara-vitsenkova/shop https://www.facebook.com/tvitsenkova/ https://www.instagram.com/tvitsenkova/

My favorite art store in Toronto is Deserres at Spadina Ave

https://www.coursera.org/learn/roman-architecture/home/welcome

Painting – Forum at Pompeii, Roman Architecture

Year of construction 2 century BC

Address: Forum, Pompeii

Tools used for my painting Watercolour Alizarium and raw siena Cotman, Derwent, Albert Durer and Faber Castell watercolour pencils. Paper watercolour Acquarello watercolour album. Fabriano, grana grossa rouch album, 22×30 cm (9 ×12 in.)

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Art and Travel. Introduction to Pompeii and the City’s History.

Artist, Roman Architecture, Uncategorized, Urban sketching, Voyage

Watercolor journey with the course Roman Architecture by the Yale University.

I continue the stay-at-home travel Art + Roman Architecture + the city of Rome with Yale’s course Roman Architecture https://www.coursera.org/learn/roman-architecture.

C. 4-1

Visiting ancient Pompeii is like traveling back in time. It is a ghost town near city of Naples the Mediterranean sea. You are immediately transported to 79 AD as you walk along the streets of the ancient city, enter houses, feeling the era and the tragedy of that time.

I was paining Pompeii’s Temple of Jupiter with the background of the long-dormant volcano of Vesuvius. It was a small resort town in the1st century BC. In 62 AD, the earthquake struck, and the city of Pompeii was shaken to the foundation, followed by 17 years of hard work to bring it back to life, only to be followed by the Mount Vesuvius eruption, which covered the nearly-restored city with blanket of ash and lava in 79 AD.

Interestingly enough, the history of Pompeii is much longer than the Roman Pompeii. It was founded in 8 century BC during the Iron Age. It was overseen by an italic tribe called Oscans, then Samnite. For the next 1.5 century, the construction of most buildings in Pompeii had also begun and the city had well established villas. During this period, there was a very high civilization which included trade with Greek cities, among them Neapolis (Naples). The city fell to Rome in 89 BC and became a Roman colony in 80 BC.  Samnite’s property was confiscated by the Roman veterans that settled here. And a new page of history began… My family visited Pompeii several years ago with the Trafalgar tour and loved the well preserved city- museum under the sky.

All roads lead to Rome- Alain de Lille

Bon voyage! Until the next travel:) Stay healthy.

All paintings belong to the author. No image is to be copied without permission.

previous post

https://wordpress.com/post/travelartblog.home.blog/3079

Links

You can visit my personal website pages here and find out more about the artwork I am offering in oil and watercolor paintings; purchase canvas prints, framed prints, and more artwork.

my personal site

http://tamara-vitsenkova.pixels.com

https://www.artincanada.com/gallery/tamara-vitsenkova/ https://www.artwanted.com/tvitsenkova/slideshow/ https://fineartamerica.com/profiles/tamara-vitsenkova/shop https://www.facebook.com/tvitsenkova/ https://www.instagram.com/tvitsenkova/

My favorite art store in Toronto is Deserres at Spadina Ave

https://www.coursera.org/learn/roman-architecture/home/welcome

Painting – Pompeii, background Mount Vesuvius, Roman Architecture

Year of construction- 8 century

Address: Pompeii

Roman Architecture, Italy, architecture, landscape, watercolour, painting, impressionism, ancient, Pompeii, town, stone, column. Temple, Jupiter, earthquake, Trafalgar, Samnite, Oscan, Roman, Naples, IronAge

Tools used for my painting Watercolour Cotman madler red, Charvin bleu royal, Albert Durer and Faber Castell watercolour pencils. Paper National Gallery watercolour album, 22×30 cm (9 ×12 in.)

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Art and Travel. Concrete Transforms a Mountain at Palestrina.

Artist, Roman Architecture, Uncategorized, Urban sketching, Voyage

Watercolor journey with the course Roman Architecture by the Yale University.

I continue the stay-at-home travel Art + Roman Architecture + the city of Rome with Yale’s course Roman Architecture https://www.coursera.org/learn/roman-architecture.

Concrete Transforms a Mountain at Palestrina. 3-5

The massive site spans a mountainside spans a mountainside, built with Roman cement and remains a rare example of an intact pagan temple complex. Developing in Roman architecture later in Trajan Forum in the 2nd century AD would not possible without experimentation in concrete that took place in Palestrina, UNESCO city. There are remains of the hemicycles with very attractive of opus incertum work and embracing arms of the Barberini Palace, theatre staircase leading into it a kind of a pyramid with the goddess at the apex.

My painting is about the ancient Entertainment district with amazing complex of Sanctuary of Fortuna, the ancient market and shops, a theatre, a shopping mall, a Mecca for Romans of its day, on this hillside. Strolling past the hill with lots of terraces, with the remains of shops, you can imagine fashion lovers who went shopping, and then they could go to the theatre there. In combination with the nature on the hill, the view is fascinating and beautiful…I added blue sky colour and clean lemon yellow to my watercolour painting. The temple was dedicated to Goddess Isis and Fortune. The architecture of this monument symbolizes both of them because Isis is the loyalty, and Fortune brings good luckJ I think this is why this amazing complex has survived, and multiplied and pleased, as people remember and worhsip this unique place.

Another revolutionary discovery for the city as UNESCO World Heritage Sites that Roman architects were able to achieve for the building was their solution for the terrace on the hill. They made the upper part of the capitol columns with an angle that made it possible for the higher level of the columns to stand at the top of the lower level. Roman architects went further than Greek and Etruscan architects; they abandoned the traditional architecture and had the willingness to change things. Concrete architecture experiments prove once again they can have a lasting impact on the architecture

All roads lead to Rome- Alain de Lille

Bon voyage! Until the next travel:) Stay healthy.

All paintings belong to the author. No image is to be copied without permission.

previous post

https://travelartblog.home.blog/2021/04/21/art-and-travel-innovations-in-concrete-at-rome-the-tabularium-and-the-theatre-of-marcellus-watercolor-journey-with-the-course-roman-architecture-by-the-yale-university/

Links

You can visit my personal website pages here and find out more about the artwork I am offering in oil and watercolor paintings; purchase canvas prints, framed prints, and more artwork.

my personal site

http://tamara-vitsenkova.pixels.com

https://www.artincanada.com/gallery/tamara-vitsenkova/ https://www.artwanted.com/tvitsenkova/slideshow/ https://fineartamerica.com/profiles/tamara-vitsenkova/shop https://www.facebook.com/tvitsenkova/ https://www.instagram.com/tvitsenkova/

My favorite art store in Toronto is Deserres at Spadina Ave

Year of construction 2nd century BC

https://www.coursera.org/learn/roman-architecture/home/welcome

Painting- Palestrina, Roman Architecture

Address: Via Colle Pastino 20, 00036, Palestrina Italy

Tools used for my painting Watercolour Cotman terra de siena and viridian Corman, Charvin bleu royal, Derwent, Albert Durer and Faber Castell watercolour pencils. Paper Van Gogh, National gallery   watercolour album, 22×30 cm (9 ×12 in.)

Art and Travel. Innovations in Concrete at Rome: The Tabularium and the Theatre of Marcellus. Watercolor journey with the course Roman Architecture by the Yale University.

Artist, Roman Architecture, Uncategorized, Urban sketching, Voyage

I continue the stay-at-home travel Art + Roman Architecture + the city of Rome with Yale’s course Roman Architecture https://www.coursera.org/learn/roman-architecture.

Innovations in Concrete at Rome: The Tabularium and the Theatre of Marcellus. 3-4

Ancient Rome offered its citizens a number of stunning venues where they could be entertained, wined and dined. The Theatre of Marcellus was one the most impressive theatre, located in the center of Rome. Apparently Seven famous Hills was not enough for Roman architects and if they wanted to build a theatre on a flat terrain, they cemented an artificial hill and built a tribune in the very center of the city where people could sit. For this monument Romans used many architectural innovations, especially their pedestal and yes, the theatre was the precedent for the Colosseum. Theatre of Marcellus was reused as a fortress in middle ages, main prototype for Roman theatres and nowadays it is an expensive condominium. The Romans took what the Greek architects did, and then they took from the Etruscan architectural achievements. They combined the best of both brilliant civilizations of architectural discoveries, then added something of their own, developed further, without fear of experimenting.

For my watercolor reference’s painting of the Theatre of Marcello with a nearby column of the Temple of Apollo , I used the Google Earth app to view the building from a bird’s eye view. Julius Caezar planned the open-air theatre but died before it was completed. Then Emperor Augustus took up the reins and dedicated the theatre to memory of his nephew and son in law Marcellus in 17BC, when the theatre was used for dramas and arena fights. 

Teatro Marcello was decorated with marble statues and large bronze vases, placed around the perimeter to enhance the sound, masks of the heroes of comedies and tragedies. The inner part consisted of three tiers of marble steps, divided into sectors for noble townspeople, places for women, a separate area for common people and slaves. And the box of the emperor was separated from the other seats. Augustus ordered that the interior design of the theatre surpassed in its splendor all previous buildings.

I like how Vitruvius, the Roman genius -engineer, artist, architect and writer who wrote 10 books about architecture, described the Greek columns.  Theatre of Marcellus’s Doric columns are attached to the 1st level as a “male” column: simple, courageous, no curls or ornaments. Ionic columns are on the second floor, they are the “feminine” type of column with elements of a lady’s hairstyle. Corinthian columns probably decorated the third floor, although nothing survives of the top level, this is only an assumption of scientists since this level has not been preserved.

It was also the preliminary design for the Colosseum and they are so similar… When our family first passed by the Theatre of Marcellus we thought it is the Colosseum, from a view from another side of the street… Theatre of Marcellus was built only a couple of centuries earlier then the Colosseum. I would like to buy tickets for the Roman music concerts here. Every summer there is a series of classical concerts that take place here called “Notti Romane al Teatro di Marcello” and I would imagine the ancient open-air theatre where people used to come and listen to great music or performance in year 17 BC.

All roads lead to Rome- Alain de Lille

Bon voyage! Until the next travel:) Stay healthy.

All paintings belong to the author. No image is to be copied without permission.

previous post

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Links

You can visit my personal website pages here and find out more about the artwork I am offering in oil and watercolor paintings; purchase canvas prints, framed prints, and more artwork.

my personal site

http://tamara-vitsenkova.pixels.com

https://www.artincanada.com/gallery/tamara-vitsenkova/ https://www.artwanted.com/tvitsenkova/slideshow/ https://fineartamerica.com/profiles/tamara-vitsenkova/shop https://www.facebook.com/tvitsenkova/ https://www.instagram.com/tvitsenkova/

My favorite art store in Toronto is Deserres at Spadina Ave

Painting – Rome, Theatre of Marcellus, Roman Architecture

https://www.coursera.org/learn/roman-architecture/home/welcome

Year of construction –  17 year BC 

Address: Via del Teatro di Marcello, 00186 Roma RM, Italy

Tools used for my painting Watercolour Cotman terra de siena and viridian Corman, Charvin bleu royal, Derwent, Albert Durer and Faber Castell watercolour pencils. Paper Van Gogh, National gallery   watercolour album, 22×30 cm (9 ×12 in.)

Art and Travel. Sanctuaries and the expressive potential of Roman concrete construction.

Artist, Roman Architecture, Uncategorized, Urban sketching, Voyage

Watercolor journey with the course Roman Architecture by the Yale University.

I continue the stay-at-home travel Art + Roman Architecture + the city of Rome with Yale’s course Roman Architecture https://www.coursera.org/learn/roman-architecture.

Sanctuaries and the expressive potential of Roman concrete construction. 3-3

This lecture was about two Sanctuaries, they were meant to attract large numbers of people to visit the Temples, shopping areas, souvenir shops, theatre. The Sanctuary of Hercules at Tivoli had columns placed engaged or attached, the prototype for the Coliseum in Rome, with the actual street Via Tiburtina that was leaving from Rome to Tivoli so people can’t miss it. Not just to walk through it but to see something that really amazes the eye.

My painting is about a Roman place of the Sanctuary of the Temple of Jupiter, Anxur of Terratine and its internal corridor of the Sanctuary of Jupiter, where the podium is well preserved. I was attracted by the reference in the professor’s photo, where the doors smoothly merged into one another. This reminded me of sci-fi movies where you see some doors receding to another planet or century or place…

This revolutionary design was used in many other architectural monuments.  It’s not just about the view of the doors that look as if they are diminishing in size, although they aren’t in reality but also the idea of creating exciting visual experiences as you walks through something. There are rounded entrances, as if it’s a corridor of time, coming to us from the future to the past or vice versa. It’s a magical phenomenon that fascinates through the creation of vista and panorama with mirroring doors that lead you to where you wish to travel: whether to the past or the future with something new to learn and return with new knowledge.

All roads lead to Rome- Alain de Lille

Bon voyage! Until the next travel:) Stay healthy.

All paintings belong to the author. No image is to be copied without permission.

previous post

https://travelartblog.home.blog/2021/04/05/art-and-travel-the-first-experiments-in-roman-concrete-construction-watercolor-journey-with-the-course-roman-architecture-by-the-yale-university/

You can visit my personal website pages here and find out more about the artwork I am offering in oil and watercolor paintings; purchase canvas prints, framed prints, and more artwork.

Painting- Temple of Jupiter, Anxur of Terratine, Roman Architecture

https://www.coursera.org/learn/roman-architecture/home/welcome

Year of construction –  mid-second century BC 

Address: Piazzale Loffredo, 04019 Terracina LT, Italy

Tools used for my painting Watercolour Cotman terra de siena and viridian Corman, Charvin bleu royal, Derwent, Albert Durer and Faber Castell watercolour pencils. Paper Van Gogh, National gallery   watercolour album, 22×30 cm (9 ×12 in.)

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Art and Travel. Defensive Stone walls and regular town planning, Roman Architecture.

Artist, Roman Architecture, Uncategorized, Urban sketching, Voyage

Watercolor journey with the course Roman Architecture by the Yale University.

I continue the stay-at-home travel Art + Roman Architecture + the city of Rome with Yale’s course Roman Architecture https://www.coursera.org/learn/roman-architecture.

Defensive Stone walls and regular town planning, Roman Architecture. 2-3.

The wall around Rome itself and Rome was encircled by Servian Walls in Rome dates to 373 BC. Romans were colonizing towns in Italy, and they were putting walls around them. Gate of Falerii Novi is one of the small town’s ancient walls near Rome that was built in 241 B.C. The quite spectacular arch was completed in extraordinary creative and innovative way in Roman architecture. It all begins here in the arch of the gate and the wall of Falerii Novi according the Roman Architecture course. Romans started to think making of urban spaces and places during this particular period. They were very careful about their selection of materials, reddish brown tufa and grey peperino stones, in order to emphasize this distinction in texture and in color. They started to use the alternating square and rectangular blocks as well the scheme of headers and stretchers for this wall.

The painting is about Gate of Falerii Novi, one of the earliest and masterfully done arch in Roman architecture. The architect has achieved is to take a series of wedge shaped blocks, it was here that stone cutting began. What is unique, because it is neatly laid out in order (long to short) and it is so elegantly done that everything is still perfectly preserved. . The Romans were concerned that the barbarians could attack and destroy their cities, not only Rome, but also their small other cities, and through gaining experience, continued to make revolutionary discoveries in architecture.

Beauty and tenderness and strength that preserve the inviolability of the Roman era, which attracts me from high school, I see echoes of those first Roman gates in any world building including Toronto. It is a perfect one-day trip from Rome.

How can I ever miss such a trip before? I hope to paint En plein air this monument soon and to gaze up at and enjoy the Gate of Falerii Novi that was built more than twenty two centuries ago.

All roads lead to Rome- Alain de Lille

Bon voyage! Until the next travel:) Stay healthy.

All paintings belong to the author. No image is to be copied without permission.

previous post

You can visit my personal website pages here and find out more about the artwork I am offering in oil and watercolor paintings; purchase canvas prints, framed prints, and more artwork.

https://www.coursera.org/learn/roman-architecture/home/welcome

My favorite art store in Toronto is Deserres at Spadina Ave

Painting- Gate of Falerii Novi, Roman Architecture

Year of construction- 241 BC 

Address- Falerii, Lazio, Italy

Tools used for my painting Watercolour Charvin ochre rouge + violet-Cotman dioxazine purple, Derwent, Albert Durer and Faber Castell watercolour pencils. Paper Fluid 100, cold press watercolour album, 22×30 cm (9 ×12 in.))

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Art and Travel. Rome, Temple of Jupiter OMG, Capitolini Triad, Roman Architecture. Watercolor journey with the course Roman Architecture by the Yale University.

Artist, Roman Architecture, Uncategorized, Urban sketching, Voyage

I continue the stay-at-home travel Art + Roman Architecture + the city of Rome with Yale’s course Roman Architecture https://www.coursera.org/learn/roman-architecture. Rome, the Temple of Jupiter Optimus Maximus Capitolinus, Roman Architecture. 2-2.

I should admit that the information from this lecture is my favourite one so far from the course. The temple of Jupiter, Juno and Minerva, was built under rule of the Etruscan King Tarquinius Priscus and completed by his grandson king Tarquinius Superbus on the Capitoline Hill in the sixth century BC. Design of the building had the huge impact for Roman and world architecture. There was a vast and beautiful Temple dedicated to three gods- Jupiter and his two female goddess companions, Minerva, the goddess of the art, wisdom, medicine, commerce, handicrafts, poetry and Juno, the goddess who protected the nation as a whole and also kept special watch over all aspects of women’s lives.

I understand why it was such a beautiful Temple… because two out of three parts were dedicated to the female goddesses, and each god had a single cella. The Temple had the triple entrance way into tree cellas of the structure. Democracy and equality for the 6th century BC, do you agree? The main temple was rebuilt several times, and all the time a colossal structure towered over the city with importance as a cultural, religious and civic center of Rome. The Temple was as beautiful as a miracle. I will add two quotes about the building from the Yale Roman Architecture course to this post:

· Roman emperor Constantia’s II in the 4 century AD articulates it grandeur well: “beside the Temple of Jupiter everything else is like earth compared to heaven”.

· Cicero, after the great fire of 83 B.C. and the rebuilding of the Temple of Jupiter OMG in marble: “Let us feel that conflagration to have been the will of heaven, and its purpose not to destroy the temple of Almighty Jupiter, but to demand of us one more splendid and magnificent!”

My painting is about the Chief temple of ancient Rome, the most important temple completed with mud brick for the podium and for the walls, wood and a red terracotta roof.

An absolute discovery for me was that the Temple was built prior to the construction of the Parthenon in Athens (447 B.C.). Romans looked back to other nations’ architecture, what had been done by the Greeks and what had been done by the Etruscans. Romans picked and chose what they liked in each and they brought that together in an entirely new creation, with their own culture and religion. Roman architects mixed it up and creation a distinctive style, that we know now as the Roman temple. Another interesting fact is that the religious service took place outside, the priest would officiate outside the temple, and very few were allowed to go inside to see sacred cult statues.

The temple was the only building that survived after the raiding of the barbarians in the 3rd century AD. The temple stood for about 1000 years. The remains can still be seen in the Piazzale Caffarelli, now part of the Capitoline Museums, and of its garden in Rome. Our family was several times in the museum, walked along this part of the museum and did not even suspect what miracle of architecture we were passing by, we hope to return back soon and enjoy the remains of the greatest architectural project in the 6th century BC.

All roads lead to Rome- Alain de Lille

Bon voyage! Until the next travel:) Stay healthy.

All paintings belong to the author. No image is to be copied without permission.

previous post

Links

You can visit my personal website pages here and find out more about the artwork I am offering in oil and watercolor paintings; purchase canvas prints, framed prints, and more artwork.

my personal site http://tamara-vitsenkova.pixels.com

https://www.artincanada.com/gallery/tamara-vitsenkova/ https://www.artwanted.com/tvitsenkova/slideshow/ https://fineartamerica.com/profiles/tamara-vitsenkova/shop https://www.facebook.com/tvitsenkova/ https://www.instagram.com/tvitsenkova/

https://www.coursera.org/learn/roman-architecture/home/welcome

My favorite art store in Toronto is Deserres at Spadina Ave

Painting- Rome, Temple of Jupiter OMG, Capitolini Triad, Roman Architecture

Year of construction- Precisely in 509

Address Via del Tempio di Giove, 18, 00186 Roma RM, Italy

Tools used for my painting Watercolour Charvin Savannah + Van Gogh ultramarine, Derwent, Albert Durer and Faber Castell watercolour pencils. Paper Acquarello Fabriano, grana grossa rouch watercolour album, 22×30 cm (9 ×12 in.)

Art and Travel. The first experiments in Roman concrete construction.

Artist, Roman Architecture, Uncategorized, Urban sketching, Voyage

Watercolor journey with the course Roman Architecture by the Yale University.

I continue the stay-at-home travel Art + Roman Architecture + the city of Rome with Yale’s course Roman Architecture https://www.coursera.org/learn/roman-architecture.

The first experiments in Roman concrete construction. 3-2

There was an ancient large warehouse on the banks of the Tiber River in Rome. This site was found due to archaeological research in Rome. Scientists used the great Roman historian Livy’s notes,  who was writing about Porticus Aemilia in the age of Augustus. In addition, the marble Map of Rome, partly readable, was helping this discovery. In the lecture there was a restored view of the Basicilica Aemilia and how it looked like. It was made of concrete and it had barrel vaults that opened the walls up, created piers, and arches above those piers, so both axial movements through the building was available but also with lateral movement, revolutionary architecture.

For my painting I found a video on YouTube with Roman archeological professor at the heart of the ancient Porticus Aemilia.  I added some murky greenish waters of the Tiber, as the Google earth app always shows the river with green vs. blue color.  The Porticus Aemila had four tiers rising up ever so slightly along the slope, with barrel vault, arched doorways, as well as the arched windows. The ancient four-story storage’s building had excellent architectural additions.

It was a beautiful building near the river with the light penetrating everywhere, unlike the boring gloomy modern warehouses. Roman architects were using their revolutionary solutions of using concrete. This design would be difficult to make out of stone, but concrete did its thing. Voila:)

All roads lead to Rome- Alain de Lille

Bon voyage! Until the next travel:) Stay healthy.

All paintings belong to the author. No image is to be copied without permission.

previous post

https://travelartblog.home.blog/2021/04/05/art-and-travel-roman-concrete-and-the-revolution-in-roman-architecture-watercolor-journey-with-the-course-roman-architecture-by-the-yale-university/

You can visit my personal website pages here and find out more about the artwork I am offering in oil and watercolor paintings; purchase canvas prints, framed prints, and more artwork.

My favorite art store in Toronto is Deserres at Spadina Ave

Panting- Rome, Porticus Aemilia, Roman Architecture

https://www.coursera.org/learn/roman-architecture/home/welcome

Year of construction- 193B.C.

Address: Via Rubattino, 38, 00153 Roma RM, Italy

Tools used for my painting Watercolour Cotman terra de siena and viridian Corman, Charvin bleu royal, Derwent, Albert Durer and Faber Castell watercolour pencils. Paper Van Gogh, National gallery   watercolour album, 22×30 cm (9 ×12 in.)

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Art and Travel. Roman concrete and the revolution in Roman Architecture. Watercolor journey with the course Roman Architecture by the Yale University.

Artist, Roman Architecture, Uncategorized, Urban sketching, Voyage

I continue the stay-at-home travel Art + Roman Architecture + the city of Rome with Yale’s course Roman Architecture https://www.coursera.org/learn/roman-architecture.

Roman concrete and the revolution in Roman Architecture. 3-1

There is a wonderful place near Rome, UNESCO city of Palestrina. The Sanctuary of Fortuna Primigenia at Palestrina (ancient Praeneste) in Italy was built in the 2nd century BCE to honour of the Goddess Isis, the goddess of femininity and motherhood and Fortuna, the ancient Roman goddess of luck. It was built on a natural hill on cement.


My painting is about the interior space of the Sanctuary of Fortuna Primigenia. It was a Sanctuary with built-in shops and a detached theatre in the Middle Ages. For my painting I added subtle bluish and greenish hues, because, of course, the stones fell off and the cement had been exposed over the millennia. Luckily for us, the Temple with its delicate arches has survived until now, and modern architects and archaeologists continue to explore and discover the secrets of ancient Roman architects even after millennia.


The genius Roman architects noticed that the volcanic dust, which is found in the sea in Italy, turns into pumice when in multitude. They realized that it can be used to strengthen any building. This revolutionary discovery created the Roman cement from ash, lime, sand, pebbles of a certain size and volcanic ash and sea water. Added either be large stone blocks or it could be small pieces of stone presses into the concrete when concrete was still wet. When dried, that stones made the building look more attractive and protected the building from moisture.


Like modern constructors, the Romans erected wooden frames for the walls and ceilings and poured the concrete into them. Romans solved two problems this way, protected cement from moisture and hid the non-attractive part of cement at the same time. I would add that they were saving money for the construction and gaining valuable experience. Using the new revolutionary technology, they started to build not only Temples and villas for the rich, they started to develop and build more, and thanks to this experience and development, today we can still admire the architectural monuments of the past.

Another one-day trip from Rome is on my way in Italy:)

All roads lead to Rome- Alain de Lille

Bon voyage! Until the next travel:) Stay healthy.

All paintings belong to the author. No image is to be copied without permission.

previous post

https://travelartblog.home.blog/2021/04/05/art-and-travel-the-advent-of-the-corinthian-order-roman-architecture-watercolor-journey-with-the-course-roman-architecture-by-the-yale-university/

Links

You can visit my personal website pages here and find out more about the artwork I am offering in oil and watercolor paintings; purchase canvas prints, framed prints, and more artwork.

my personal site http://tamara-vitsenkova.pixels.com

https://www.artincanada.com/gallery/tamara-vitsenkova/ https://www.artwanted.com/tvitsenkova/slideshow/ https://fineartamerica.com/profiles/tamara-vitsenkova/shop https://www.facebook.com/tvitsenkova/ https://www.instagram.com/tvitsenkova/

https://www.coursera.org/learn/roman-architecture/home/welcome

My favorite art store in Toronto is Deserres at Spadina Ave

Painting- Palestrina, Roman Architecture

Year of construction 2nd century BC

Address: Via Colle Pastino 20, 00036, Palestrina Italy

Tools used for my painting Watercolour Cotman terra de siena and viridian Corman, Charvin bleu royal, Derwent, Albert Durer and Faber Castell watercolour pencils. Paper Van Gogh, National gallery   watercolour album, 22×30 cm (9 ×12 in.)

Art and Travel. The advent of the Corinthian Order, Roman Architecture.

Artist, Roman Architecture, Uncategorized, Urban sketching, Voyage

Watercolor journey with the course Roman Architecture by the Yale University.

I continue the stay-at-home travel Art + Roman Architecture + the city of Rome with Yale’s course Roman Architecture https://www.coursera.org/learn/roman-architecture.

The advent of the Corinthian Order Roman Architecture. 2-5.

In Tivoli, not far from Rome, there is a gentle, feminine temple of Vesta that beautifully situated over a particularly verdant area of Tivoli. It is very well preserved and still has details of ancient walls and columns. The temple was built in the 1st century BC on the hill of the ancient acropolis of the city of Tibur, formerly called Tivoli. The city was under the Etruscan king’s rule and also had Greek artistic traditions. In combination it had a strong influence on local art and architecture.

My painting is about this feminine Temple, I did it with very delicate, very soft paints; my favourite colors smoothly flow and complement each other. The Temple of Vesta with its base of the structure that grows out of the rock, harmoniously continues it, and rushes to the graceful round rotunda on the ten columns of the Corinth. The frieze is decorated with reliefs depicting bull skulls, a tribute to the Roman tradition of sacrifice, and heavy garlands hanging from them. A cella is inscribed in the circumference of the rotunda, the core of all the buildings, the place where the ceremonies were carried out. The dome of the rotunda had a hole for the smoke of the sacred fire that burned here in honour of Vesta with delicate, lace and aerial structure.

The columns were invented by the Greeks and Romans and used all three types – Doric, Ionic and Corinthian. The Corinthian column is equally beautiful from all sides due to its harmony and it was more popular in Roman Architecture. The Temple is located on a hill that fits perfectly into the landscape, like a young girl, with curls; reminiscent of a popular widespread Italian flower. The column looks the same and beautiful from all angles with harmony that, objectively, makes it the best

All roads lead to Rome- Alain de Lille

Bon voyage! Until the next travel:) Stay healthy.

All paintings belong to the author. No image is to be copied without permission.

previous post

You can visit my personal website pages here and find out more about the artwork I am offering in oil and watercolor paintings; purchase canvas prints, framed prints, and more artwork.

https://www.coursera.org/learn/roman-architecture/home/welcome

My favorite art store in Toronto is Deserres at Spadina Ave

Painting- Temple of Vesta, Tivoli, Roman Architecture

Year of construction 1st century BC

Address: Piazza Tempio di Vesta, 6, 00019 Tivoli RM, Italy

Tools used for my painting Watercolour Cotman terra de siena and viridian Corman, Charvin bleu royal, Derwent, Albert Durer and Faber Castell watercolour pencils. Paper Van Gogh, National gallery   watercolour album, 22×30 cm (9 ×12 in.)

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Art and Travel. The Hellenization of late Republican temple, Roman Architecture.

Artist, Roman Architecture, Uncategorized, Urban sketching, Voyage

Watercolor journey with the course Roman Architecture by the Yale University

I continue the stay-at-home travel Art + Roman Architecture + the city of Rome with Yale’s course Roman Architecture https://www.coursera.org/learn/roman-architecture.

The Hellenization of late Republican temple, Roman Architecture. 2-4.

The Temple of Portunus is located in the former of the Forum Boarium, nowadays it is on the Piazza della Bocca della Verità, very popular place of the Mouth of Truth from the movie Roman Holiday with stars Audrey Hepburn and Gregory Peck.

It used be a major commercial area along the banks of the Tiber in antiquity. In the Republican times here was a small port nearby from the side of the Tiber and market, where a lively livestock trade was carried on.

My painting is about the Temple of Portunus; the reference was my husband’s photo from our trip to Rome several years ago. From a distance the impression is that the whole building was made out of stone. The temple of Portunus by Tiber with their columns encircles the structure but is engaging into the wall. It characterizes the Ionic order, called spiral volutes. Greeks’ ionic capitals created for this type of column decoration like a hairstyle, the front parts of them with curls (ionic cymatium) and fruit garlands, and flutes were drawn along the entire trunk, descending like folds on the dress of bride 😉 This is another example that Roman architects looked at Etruscan and Greek precedents, decided what they like and mixed it up the way it best represented their own culture and religion. Another revolutionary step of Roman Architecture for this Temple was using roman concrete construction inside of the podium. This is the reason why Temple of Portunus is one of the few ancient buildings that have managed to stay intact until today.

In the middle ages the temple of Portunus was recreated to a Christian church, and this is another reason why it has been perfectly preserved. In this course the Professor showed the 19th century painting of the temple of Portunus with some architectural changes by this time. Nowadays we can see that the Temple was renovated closer to the original design of the structure, very important for the future preservation of Roman architecture.

In the ancient Roman mythology Portunus was considered the god of doors, keys and honeycomb, the guard of entrances and exits. I would like to go back and visit not just the outside and inside and I see everything with my own eyes. And I hope that the ancient god Portunus will open the door of its Temple for us.

All roads lead to Rome- Alain de Lille

Bon voyage! Until the next travel:) Stay healthy.

All paintings belong to the author. No image is to be copied without permission.

previous post

You can visit my personal website pages here and find out more about the artwork I am offering in oil and watercolor paintings; purchase canvas prints, framed prints, and more artwork.

https://www.coursera.org/learn/roman-architecture/home/welcome

My favorite art store in Toronto is Deserres at Spadina Ave

Painting-  Temple of Portunus, Rome, Roman Architecture

Year of construction-between 120 and 80 BC

Address- Piazza della Bocca della Verità, 00186 Roma RM, Italy

Tools used for my painting Watercolour siena, burnt siena Van Gogh, perm red light, lemon yellow, viridian Cotman Charvin ochre rouge + violet-Cotman dioxazine purple, Derwent, Albert Durer and Faber Castell watercolour pencils. Paper Acquarello watercolour album. Fabriano, grana grossa rouch watercolour album, 22×30 cm (9 ×12 in.)

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Art and Travel. – Rome, Palatine Hill, Romulus Founds Rome.

Artist, Roman Architecture, Uncategorized, Urban sketching, Voyage

Watercolor journey with the course Roman Architecture by the Yale University.

I continue the stay-at-home travel Art + Roman Architecture + the city of Rome with Yale’s course Roman Architecture https://www.coursera.org/learn/roman-architecture. Rome, Palatine Hill, Romulus Founds Rome, Roman Architecture. 2-1.

Romulus founded the city of Rome and on Palatine Hill and archaeologists still find the remains of that village and houses from which the Roman Empire began to expand. It is difficult to imagine that on this huge passage there was once a small village, which was dug into a wonderful city, my beloved Rome. According to the legend, Romulus founded the City of Rome, on the 21st of April in 753 BC. Romulus village had huts made of wood that thatched roofs. There are similar huts in a small village in the Maya Riviera near Cancun. Anyone who will visit this place might imagine that they are in a future city of Rome of the 8 century BC.

The Palatine Hill is the oldest inhabited one in Rome. Actually, the name of the hill comes from the name of the goddess Pales – the patroness of cattle. The hill has long been a place for grazing pets and worshiping this goddess. The first permanent settlements appeared here in about 1000 BC, judging by the archaeological artefacts appeared on the Palatine. There is the Palatine Hill’s archaeological museum with the Romulus House with the model of huts in the village of the Iron Age.

Several years ago I was in the Capitoline Museums in Rome, near the reproduced images of the Romulus village at the Palatine and Capitoline Hills; I stared in these pictures with fascination to find more information. Who would have known that in a few years I will learn about the Roman architecture and I will have the opportunity to understand why I was so delighted?

All roads lead to Rome- Alain de Lille

Bon voyage! Until the next travel:) Stay healthy.

All paintings belong to the author. No image is to be copied without permission.

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You can visit my personal website pages here and find out more about the artwork I am offering in oil and watercolor paintings; purchase canvas prints, framed prints, and more artwork.

https://www.coursera.org/learn/roman-architecture/home/welcome

My favorite art store in Toronto is Deserres at Spadina Ave

Rome, Palatine Hill, Romulus Founds Rome, Roman Architecture

Year of construction- 753 BC

Address: Rome, Palatine Hill, Piazza S. Maria Nova, 53V

Tools used for my painting Watercolour Charvin Ruby red and Emerald,Derwent, Albert Durer and Faber Castell watercolour pencils. Paper Acquarello Fabriano cold pressed watercolour album, 22×30 cm (9 ×12 in.)

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